Welcome to the New Student Tutorial

Welcome to RadGrad! Want to learn why you should use RadGrad in just 60 seconds? Try watch this:

C'mon, just watch the video already! It's only one minute long!

Thank you.

OK, so as the video says (in a much better way), there are two fundamental reasons you'll want to use RadGrad:

First reason to use RadGrad: Find others with similar interests

Computer science and engineering encompasses an incredibly large range of interest areas. Some students are into blockchain and cryptocurrency, others like animation and storytelling. Still others enjoy capture-the-flag security contests, while others want to use technology to address climate change. We are nothing if not diverse!

This creates a problem: how do you connect with the people, both inside and outside the university, who are interested in the same things you are?

So, the first reason to use RadGrad is to help you find your communities of practice: groups of people who are interested in the same kinds of things you are, and who can help you learn more about them.

Second reason to use RadGrad: Prepare to get that first job after graduation!

Just having a computer science or computer engineering degree is no guarantee that you'll land a decent job after graduation. These days, you need more. But classwork takes up a lot of your time already, and maybe you have a part-time job on top of it. No one has much extra time.

So, the second reason to use RadGrad is to help you make efficient use of your extra time. RadGrad helps you find activities that build up your skill in areas of specific interest to you. But beyond that, RadGrad helps you plan out your degree experience to include activities that build your Innovation, Competency, and Experience. It helps make sure you don't have "gaps" in your undergraduate experience when you go after that first job.

Let's get started!

Now that you know why it's good to use RadGrad, let's learn how to use RadGrad. Click the link below to move to the next page of this New Student Tutorial.

Last updated on by Philip Johnson